2017 Louis Jadot Barrel Tasting at Wine Watch with special guest winemaker Frederick Barnier

Tuesday, January 29, 2019 - 07:30 PM

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"Drinking is a very demanding profession and I can't hold down two jobs at once"

Morgan Freidman

We would like to remind our "Wine Drinking People" that everyday above ground is reason to celebrate as you never know when your last day is don’t save that special bottle make it a special occasion tonight and drink it!! 

And we are very excited to have winemaker Frederick Barnier from Louis Jadot back at Wine Watch on Tuesday, January 29th for a preview of the 2017 vintage from Burgundy.  You will get a first hand look at the 2017 vintage from one of the brightest minds in Burgundy and there will be 20 wines on the table this evening!!  I know there are only 18 on the list below but you always get extra at the Wine Watch tasting and we have a nice collection of older vintage Louis Jadot wines on hand so we will show you one older white and one older red Burgundy to give you perspective on how these wines age.  And for those of you that can’t make the tasting I have included all the Louis Jadot wines we have in the store on this offering including the 2016 vintage wines that are still available.

I was disappointed but happy to see longtime winemaker at Louis jadot Jacques Lardiere with (375ml) bottles 2003 vintage barrel samples in my store in 2004.  I remember it was a difficult year because of the heat and this was also the year that they stopped doing their annual Barrel tasting event in South Florida.  Jacques also indicated that it was a small vintage- thus the (375ml) barrel samples.  I expressed my disappointment that they stopped conducting this barrel tasting here in South Florida and Jacques said he would speak with the folks at Kobrand to see if we could set up an event with our Burgundy drinking people to keep them up to date on the quality of each new vintage in Burgundy with an abbreviated version of this tasting.

Well- ask and you shall receive! We have conducted a Louis Jadot Barrel tasting nearly every year since!!   It looks like both the 2015 and 2016 vintages from Burgundy are Excellent to outstanding in quality although the quantity in some parts of the Cotes d'or was severely diminished.  The last vintage where they had a full harvest before 2017 was 2007!  The 2017 vintage was not only plentiful, but it also was another high quality vintage. 

Join us as we welcome Frederick to Wine Watch and as we taste through some Burgundy from the 2017 vintage along with a three-course menu to accompany the tasting wines.  The price for this tasting which includes dinner is $125 + tax, for reservations call 954-523-9463 or e-mail andy@winewatch.com.

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Image result for Louis Jadot winemaker  Frederick Barnier
2017 Louis Jadot Barrel Tasting at Wine Watch
with special guest winemaker Frederick Barnier
Tuesday, January 29, 2019
7:30 PM
2017 Louis Jadot White Burgundies:
.               Domaine Ferret, Pouilly-Fuisse, Tete de Cru, Les Perrieres
.               Chablis, 1er Cru, Montee de Tonnere
.               Chablis, Grand Cru, Blanchots
.               Santenay, 1er Cru, Clos Faubard
.               Puligny-Montrachet, 1er Cru, Clos de la Garenne
.               Batard-Montrachet Grand Cru

2017 Louis Jadot Red Burgundies:
.               Chateau des Jacques, Moulin-a-Vent, Clos des Grand Carquelin
.               Chateau des Jacques, Morgon, Cote du Py
.               Pernand-Vergelesses 1er Cru Clos de la Croix de Pierre
.               Savigny-Les-Beaune 1er Cru Clos des Guettes
.               Beaune, 1er Cru, Les Cras
.               Pommard, 1er Cru, Grands-Epenots
.               Corton-Pougets, Grand Cru, Domaine des Heritiers Louis Jadot
.               Nuits St. Georges, 1er Cru, Les Vaucrains
.               Chambolle-Musigny, 1er Cru, Les Charmes
.               Gevrey-Chambertin, 1er Cru, Les Cazetiers
.               Clos Vougeot, Grand Cru, Domaine Louis Jadot
.               Echezeaux, Grand Cru

Menu
Selection of Charcuterie and Cheese
Tuna Poke with coconut with mint and lime
Chicken Breast fried in Panko with Foie Gras Butter over red wine soup
Epoisses and Cherry Tart

The fee for this tasting which includes dinner is $125 + tax for reservations call 954-523-9463 or e-mail andy@winewatch.com.  Please let us know when you make your reservation if you would like a mixed greens salad instead of Foie Gras and chef Toni will be happy to accommodate your dietary needs.

A bit about the 2017 vintage from Burgundy as published in Decanter magazine.

Burgundy 2017: When Côte d’Or prayers were answered?
By: William Kelley September 20, 2017

It's been a rollercoaster, but 2017 could be the biggest overall crop since 2009. Can quantity combine with quality? William Kelley gives his initial view on how the Burgundy 2017 vintage looks after spending September in the region and following the harvest.

Along the Côte d’Or, the sound of honking horns and cheering pickers announces that the Burgundy 2017 harvest is coming to an end.

After a succession of meagre years, beset by hail, rot and frost, nature has finally answered growers’ prayers, delivering a plentiful crop to equal or surpass the volumes achieved in 2009, the region’s last abundant vintage. After the gloom of 2016, a year ravished by the worst frosts since 1985, spirits this year are buoyant and the atmosphere cheerful.
burgundy 2017, pinot noir

The vintage’s signature: a heavy crop of Pinot Noir in Volnay Santenots. Credit: William Kelley.

At domaines with empty cellars and correspondingly depleted coffers, 2017’s bounty may prove of truly existential importance.

‘We’re thankful’, confesses Cyril Audouin, whose Marsannay vineyards were ravished by frost in 2016. ‘Everyone in the Côte d’Or is smiling this year’, agrees Véronique Drouhin: ‘it’s so nice to have full fermenters!’ Moreover, with such an abundance of wine now waiting in the wings, it is to be hoped that the pressure to increase prices for the 2016 vintage will be less keenly felt.

A complex growing season may be briefly summarized. When frosts threatened in April, growers determined not to relive the heartbreak of 2016 banded together, burning bales of straw to ward off the cold.

Only Chablis was less fortunate. As William Fèvre’s Alain Marcuello told Andrew Jefford, ‘the problem in Chablis is that the frost went on for 15 nights. Most growers ran out of frost candles after five days; there were none left anywhere in Europe by the end.’

Hot weather followed hard on the heels of the April chills, in some instances disrupting flowering, as Jacques Carillon reported in his Puligny-Montrachet premier crus. The summer’s heat also stressed the vines, sometimes shriveling berries and retarding physiological ripening.

Hail on 10th July, its impact largely confined to Morey-Saint-Denis, damaged grapes. Then, in late August, much needed rain brought relief, helping vines to bring their fruit to fuller maturity.
Burgundy 2017 harvest report

Grand Echézeaux, Echézeaux and the Clos Vougeot after a light shower during harvest. Credit: William Kelley.

By late August and early September, harvesting had begun. Arnaud Ente in Meursault, generally one of the region’s first to pick, started on 25 August, and by 1 September the Chardonnay vintage was well under way in both the Côte de Beaune and the Mâconnais.

With rain forecast at the end of the week, the first reds were picked around the same time, Charles Lachaux of Vosne-Romanée and François Millet of Chambolle-Musigny’s Domaine Comte de Vogüé both beginning on 2 September. Others chose to wait, Sebastien Cathiard only beginning two weeks later, and the Domaine Ponsot finally getting underway on 19 September.

As ever, deciding when to harvest was a delicate matter: rain did indeed transpire on 9 September, continuing on-and-off for the following week. ‘If we could have counted on good weather, I’d have waited’, reflected Jeremy Seysses of Domaine Dujac.

Some of those who did wait were bullish, others regretful. At many addresses, difficulties in finding pickers brought further complications: ‘the French don’t want to do the work anymore’, was a common complaint.
burgundy wine press

Frédéric Lafarge presses his Volnay Clos du Château des Ducs the old-fashioned way. Credit: William Kelley.

Along the Côte d’Or, the crop was plentiful and generally healthy. Vines touched by frost the year before tended to give especially generous, sometimes excessive, yields: rumors of 100 hl/ha in parts of the Côte de Beaune, well in excess of the appellation limits, should give pause.

Skins were thick, thanks to the summer heat, and generally well-developed, reminding Cécile Tremblay of 2010, but seeds and stems were more unevenly ripe. Sugars, diluted by rain, were seldom especially high, and many producers will need to chaptalise.

Further north, growers in Chablis seem delighted with the grapes that were spared by the April frosts.

What can we expect from the wines? It’s too early to have much sense of their character, and on the red side of the ledger, the vintage suggests comparatively few analogies, the cool harvest weather, punctuated by showers, having put paid to any premature comparisons with 2009.
It will be distinctions between producers that make all the difference

Some, including Jadot’s Pierre Henri Gagey, tentatively invoke the red wines of 1999.

It certainly seems probable that the 2017 vintage, like 1999, will test the compatibility of quality and quantity. Low yields, argues Loïc Dugat-Py of Gevrey-Chambertin, were the secret to attaining full ripeness and retaining acidity, a contention that was frequently seconded along the Côte.

Over-cropped Pinot Noir may be supple and easy drinking, but it is unlikely to be either profound or age-worthy. If 2016 was a vintage where the weather drew stark contrasts across the Côte d’Or, ravaging some appellations but sparing others, 2017 has been even-handed: it will be distinctions between producers that make all the difference.

Chardonnay, more tolerant of high yields, is likely to prove a more forgiving medium than Pinot Noir, and expectations for the 2017 whites are high.

With its early start, the year presents easier analogies, superficially evoking 2015. ‘On paper, the two are similar’, admits Jacques Carillon, ‘but I suspect the wines will be very different’.

Vincent Dancer of Chassagne-Montrachet sees signs of ‘the volume of 2015 with the acidity of 2014’, a happy union, pointing to the musts’ good levels of malic acidity.

Further south, Vincent Dureil, Rully superstar, is similarly gratified by the wines’ early balance.  ‘A very special vintage’, concludes an optimistic Pierre Yves Colin—and indisputably, we may add, a timely one."  Decanter
Read more at https://www.decanter.com/wine/wine-regions/burgundy-wine/burgundy-2017-harvest-report-william-kelley-376805/

A bit of history on Louis Jadot:

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Maison Louis Jadot was founded in 1859 by the man whose name it bears,  Louis Henry Denis Jadot - a young man of Belgian ancestry whose family had settled in Beaune near the turn of the century.  At a young age Louis Henry Jadot developed a deep interest in the wines of Burgundy; and by 1826, his father acquired a parcel in the "Clos des Ursules" vineyard in Beaune, which upon his death he bequeathed to his brother, Louis's uncle.  Under his uncle's auspices, the young Jadot greatly broadened his experience - first in the cellars in the art of evaluating the wines and then in the vineyards in the study of viticulture.  As Louis Henry travelled, he acquired a faithful clientele and in 1859 purchased the respected négociant firm of Lemaire-Fouleux.  He gave the firm his name, restructured its operations, and began to expand its business into the export markets of northern France and Belgium.  Belgium, once a province of the Duchy of Burgundy and historically the preeminent market for its wines, was, as the Jadot family's ancestral home, of particular interest to Louis Henry.  It was there that the Jadot name first began to gain renown.

As Maison Louis Jadot grew, its vineyard holdings expanded through the purchase of parcels in Beaune "Theurons" and "Clos des Couchereaux".  After the death of Louis Henry Jadot, his son, Louis Baptiste Jadot, enthusiastically carried on the work his father had begun.  Louis Baptiste expanded his export markets as well as his clientele in France, reinvesting the profits in the further acquisition of vineyards.  He judiciously made purchases in some of the finest and most famous grand and premier cru vineyards of the Côte d'Or - among them an interest in the coveted Chevalier-Montrachet "Les Demoiselles".  In 1939, Louis Baptiste Jadot died and left control of the firm to his eldest son, Louis Auguste Jadot, who had assisted in the direction of the business under his father since 1931.  Louis Auguste opened and greatly developed the new export market of the United States; he also expanded Jadot's activities in Great Britain, Holland, South America, and New Zealand.

In 1954, Andre Gagey joined Maison Louis Jadot as assistant to Louis Auguste Jadot, and this proved to be an important event in the fortunes of the Jadot firm.  The extremely capable and affable Gagey was appointed interim managing director of the firm in 1962 when Louis Auguste Jadot died, survived by his wife and a seventeen-year-old son, Louis-Alain.  Tragically, Louis-Alain was killed in a car crash at the age of 23 in 1968.  Mademoiselle Jadot then gave Gagey full responsibility for the operations of her firm, which was without heirs to run it.  Gagey placed the policy of maintaining highest quality above all others; and the impeccable reputation for honesty Maison Louis Jadot enjoys today is the reward of that perseverance.  Gagey recently retired and turned the direction of the firm over to his very competent son, Pierre-Henry Gagey.

Maison Louis Jadot's headquarters is located in the heart of Beaune.  The most glorious of its three cellars, used for storage of older vintage wines, is situated in the Convent des Jacobins once a convent of the patron Saint Dominique, founder of the Dominican order and built in 1477.  It was acquired by the Tourliere family in 1802 and has been used by Maison Louis Jadot since 1954.  In contrast, the most recent cellar, on the outskirts of Beaune, doubled production and storage capacity as of mid 1986 and is perhaps the most technologically advanced facility in France.  All white wines are fermented in cask and aged one year; red wines are aged on average eighteen months.  The type of wood used is very carefully selected - Limousin, which imparts aggressive tannins more appropriate to Bordeaux wines, is too harsh for the delicate Burgundies Jadot produces.  Wines are fined "the old way," with natural proteins - skim milk for white wines, egg whites for red wines.  The wines are then hand-racked at five intervals before bottling to assure perfect clarity and brightness.  The Jadot estate today includes ownership of parcels in the vineyards of Chevalier-Montrachet "Les Demoiselles," Corton-Charlemagne, Corton-Pougets, Beaune "Clos des Ursules," Beaune "Theurons", Beaune "Bressandes", Beaune "Boucherottes", Beaune "Clos des Couchereaux, Beaune "Les Chouacheux, and Pernand-Vergelesses "Clos de la Croix de Pierre."  In 1986 Jadot acquired the prestigious Clair-Dau Domaine and in 1987 entered into a contract to produce the wines of the renowned Duc de Magenta.  In 1990 Jadot again expanded its holdings with the purchase of the Domaine Champy in Beaune with its fifteen acres of very valuable vineyards.  In 1994 Jadot purchased another 13.26 acres in prime premier cru vineyards.  Since 1986 Jadot has more than doubled the acreage under its domaine, which together with long term contracts, brings over 160 acres of some of the finest vineyards of the Côte d'Or under Maison Louis Jadot's control.  In February of 1985, the négociant firm of Maison Louis Jadot was purchased by the American-owned Kobrand Corporation, the sole United States importer of Jadot Burgundies since 1945.  This prompted outcries in Burgundy, where it was felt that American ownership would signal the end of an era and that Maison Louis Jadot would never again be the same.  A dozen years hence the French now realize that Kobrand has brought nothing but brilliance and capital to this prestigious firm and that Jadot is producing the best wines in the firm's history.  Since 1970 the winemaker at Maison Louis Jadot has been Jacques Lardière, who is widely regarded as one of the best in Burgundy.  In 1995 he was cited by Robert Parker in The Wine Advocate as one of the top thirteen "Wine Personalities of 1995."  Parker said: "Lardière continues to go from strength to strength producing an enormous range of wines...that are among the finest from Burgundy.  His flexibility and intelligence in handling diverse vintages makes him a winemaker par excellence."  This appears on top of praise previously showered on the firm by Parker in his book titled BURGUNDY.   There Parker rates Maison Jadot between four  and five stars - near the very top of the pyramid of his rating system.  "Most of the red wines from Louis Jadot need 3-4 years in the bottle to round out, but can age for up to 15-20 years, depending on the particular cuvée. The white wines are no less brilliant than the reds."

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