Vintage Barolo Tasting back to 1950! Friday November 29th- 2019 is almost over and this is one of the last nights the Wine Bar is open this year!!

Share on Facebook

Image result for William Shakespeare


"Good wine needs no bush."

 (from: As you like It) William Shakespear 1564-1616 English Dramatist & Poet


Time is short, winter is here, and the Wine Bar is only open 5 more nights for regular service before the Christmas holiday!! We also have five “Once in a Lifetime” wine tastings left and this was just added to the calendar and I know it’s the day after Thanksgiving but I love Barolo.


Barolo is one of the world’s most age worthy wines, but there is very little of these older vintage wines available on the open market today.   I like to compare these Italian treasures to the great wines of Burgundy, another region that has to deal with harsh conditions with a varietal that is very finicky. Nebbiolo like Pinot Noir only produces great wines in the a few areas of the world.


These old wines are in excellent condition, to have this many 30+ year old wines for $125 and this includes dinner?  How can we afford to do this??  I’m retired or this is a non-profit organization doing scientific research with wine???  Don’t ask just e-mail, call or run to the store to make a reservation for this event, this tasting is limited to 12 tasters.  The fee for this event is $125 + tax, for reservations call 954-523-9463 or e-mail andy@winewatch.com.


Image result for barolo map


Vintage Barolo Piedmont Wine Tasting

Friday, November 29th

7:30pm


1950 Marchesi Di Barolo Gia Opera Pia Barolo

1970 Costamagna Di Ferraresi Barolo La Mora

1970 Giovanni Scanavino Barolo

1971 Cantine Terre Del Nebbiolo Barbaresco La Brenta D’Oro Riserva Speciale

1971 Terre Del Barolo Barolo Castiglione Falleto

1971 Giuseppe Ravinale Barolo Ca Rossa

1975 Giuseppe Barni Barolo

1979 Giovanni Scanavino Barolo

1979 Produttori Associati Vinicoli Monfortesi Barolo

1979 Cantine Della Cascina Cucco Stroppiana Barolo

1983 La Cacciatora Barolo

1985 Bersano Barolo


Menu

Reggiano Parmesan Prosciutto and Extra Virgin Olives

Bone Marrow with Black Truffles and Orange Gremolata

Nebbiolo Risotto with Black Truffles

Veal Osso Bucco Ravioli with White Truffle and Barolo Natural Sauce


This tasting is limited to 12 tasters.  The fee for this event is $125 + tax, for reservations call 954-523-9463 or e-mail andy@winewatch.com.  Let us know when you make your reservation if you have any food allergies and Toni will be happy to accommodate you.


A brief History of Barolo



Barolo has a long history of wine production, the area was named some 400 years ago and probably came from the Celtic brolio or brol, meaning "wood" or "orchard".   The region of Barolo encompasses approximately 3,000 acres of vines situated southwest of the town of Alba, in all or part of 11 communes.  First is La Morra, with nearly one-third of the total acreage.  Following in decreasing order are Serralunga d’alba, Monforte d’Alba, Barolo, and Castiglione Falletto, and parts of six other villages.  One of the most famous and most sought after vineyards in Barolo is Cannubi. 


There are two main valleys in the Barolo production zone: the Barolo Valley to the west, and the Serralunga Valley to the east.  La Morra and Barolo itself are the major villages in the western valley, which also encompasses Cherasco, Novello, Roddi d’Alba, Castiglione Falletto and Monforte are the major towns;  Diano d’Alba and Grinzane Cavour are also included in this district.  There are distinct characteristics that are indigenous to the wines of various area:  the wines of Serralunga Valley have suggestions of licorice and tar, the Barolos of Serralunga itself display camphor and mint; those from Castiglione Falleto have a pronounced licorice characteristic as well as nuances of spice, mint, dried peaches, and prunes; those from Monforte recall spices, mint hazelnuts, and almonds.  The wines from the Barolo Valley bring up underbrush and truffle, as well as licorice.  Those wines from the village of Barolo have less of a licorice character but more suggestions of underbrush, truffles, and mint.  The wines of la Morra, especially those from the slopes, combine nuances of white truffle, mint, tobacco, spices, cherries, and blackberries and those from Cannubi display motes of white truffles, underbrush, raspberries, and black cherries. 

Share on Facebook


back